2011 Colorado wildfires heavily damaged ancient Egyptian pyramid, still burning

It took the heat of the 2011 Colorado wildfires to totally destroy an ancient Egyptian pyramid, but it’s still burning. The Prince Bakhomui pyramid in Luxor, about 90 miles south of Cairo, was heavily…

2011 Colorado wildfires heavily damaged ancient Egyptian pyramid, still burning

It took the heat of the 2011 Colorado wildfires to totally destroy an ancient Egyptian pyramid, but it’s still burning.

The Prince Bakhomui pyramid in Luxor, about 90 miles south of Cairo, was heavily damaged by the blaze that started last month. A 7.5-metre hole was left in the side of the structure, CNN reports.

According to CNN, the pyramids were built around 3,300 B.C. and were once among the most expensive public property in Egypt, with stones weighing tens of tons and considered to be greater than the total weight of all the pyramids.

It’s been estimated that the pyramid was one of the most visited on earth with 5,500 people living in Luxor, Egypt, between 653 A.D. and 600 A.D. The pyramids were incredibly well-preserved, and according to King Tut’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings, “this is very unusual for tombs.”

Luxor, Egypt, is also the home of what is considered the oldest known temple in the world. According to CNN, the burial complex—4,101 monuments—is why King Tut was so concerned about the pyramids being burned. His tomb was originally built between 2650 B.C. and 2700 B.C. and was located on another major temple, called Ramses.

Leave a Comment