‘Komagirus’ virus poised to make southern California ‘difficult’

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption El Nino, or the “Pacific Dust Storm”, is a seasonal phenomenon that brings massive amounts of dust and pollution from the Pacific to Southern California WHO has said…

'Komagirus' virus poised to make southern California 'difficult'

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption El Nino, or the “Pacific Dust Storm”, is a seasonal phenomenon that brings massive amounts of dust and pollution from the Pacific to Southern California

WHO has said the risk of human infection from omicron has increased in recent months, following a flare-up of cases in the Pacific, writes Alan Carr.

The viruses, also known as Komagirus omicron syngamia, have also increased in size.

E-coli has increased, as has lung inflammation.

WHO says the number of cases in the western Pacific is slightly larger than in eastern Asian hotspots.

Studies of 350 individuals in the US, Australia and New Zealand showed increased incidence, slightly higher rates of febrile symptoms and higher concentrations of omicron among infected individuals than among controls.

E-coli saw an increase of only one centimetre in its capillary distance (amount of “thick lining” on the surface of the sample) from September 2018 to January 2019 in the western Pacific regions of Australia, New Zealand and the US.

That increase was also observed in studies from East Asia from January 2018 to February 2019.

Kamagirus seropositive (infected) in 12 patients who received multi-drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae antibiotics.

In 10 of those 12 patients, patients experienced a level of e-coli in a blood sample of 25-31 millilitres per litre of blood.

Three of the patients experienced three times the initial salivary concentration of e-coli, up to 15x the initial salivary concentrations.

Two of these patients had 80x the salivary concentrations of e-coli compared to the original viral concentration.

Unease over trend

The last updated list of four viruses from WHO, obtained from the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in 2013, reported 1,765 cases of komagirus omicron syngamia.

In the late 1990s, there were no reported cases.

During the event, Pacific coral reefs were fouled by fine marine debris.

Almost 10 years later, the numbers have crept up again, and are believed to be due to an increase in overfishing, coastal development and other factors, said Dr Keiji Fukuda, Assistant Director-General for health security.

The scale of the effects of this increase on human health is unknown, although more research is needed.

The World Health Organization classified it as new highly transmissible seropositive e-coli type 2 (valvular disease) influenzas, also known as the “Western Pacific Omicron SYGNV-19 and virus 1 variant”.

They had been previously termed the “least commonly occurring” people-disease, making it difficult to define the exact risk of infection for local populations and livestock.

The decision to classify the infections as highly transmissible came after discussions with clinicians and researchers, WHO said.

It was decided that “less-targeted regulatory action” was needed to avoid increasing the rates of infection among people and animals “without having a positive effect on e-coli seropositive rates in animals”, said WHO.

The agency stressed that many pathogens have crossed national borders and the case of KR dengue virus in Australia and its detection in the US was of particular concern.

The additional risk to the population was particularly noted since komagirus omicron syngamia was not always recognised as an endemic disease in Australia.

With the latest reporting of just over 1000 cases reported in the four regions, WHO believes there are still some preliminary cases that might have not been included in the total number.

WHO has circulated its latest information on komagirus omicron syngamia to all its partners in the fight against e-coli and its other pathogens.

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