London’s Top of the Shard has been transformed into a floating car park

A platform 33 storeys up at the Shard provides the perfect view of the sky and the City of London, while docking a yacht in the water below has been facilitated London’s Shard has…

London's Top of the Shard has been transformed into a floating car park

A platform 33 storeys up at the Shard provides the perfect view of the sky and the City of London, while docking a yacht in the water below has been facilitated

London’s Shard has been home to luxury parties, spectacular views and a weekly Top of the Shard concert; and now, for a special event, it can also be a top-deck car park.

Situated at the top of the city’s famous landmark building, a platform that, at 125 metres (394 feet), is the UK’s longest vertical car park, on one side, and high above the street on the other, houses boats for hire.

The 35-seater, is modelled on a fairytale boat, created by London-based designer Hide. The work, completed in 2012, is based on an image of a fairy-tale vessel, featuring floating roofs and a mysterious staircase. The images were then hand painted on the exterior of the boat to create the distinctive design.

The deckchairs for hire stand 17 metres from the ground, so they are best seen from the street.

There are two types of boat, for personal use or for parties – Towercoach, based in central London, with a helipad and the Queen-sized yacht Villages. Prices start at £30 an hour.

Disposable beach balls have been installed to complement the tower’s vertical look, providing a water and sky-fantasy themed game, in keeping with the general theme of the building. Banners of a chic gothic look appear to hang from the tower’s top, while a life-size cardboard figure peeps out from beneath them.

All boats hired from Towercoach have the option of a free overnight stay in a luxury hotel on the bank of the Thames, including breakfast and spa treatments.

Visitors to the Shard can use the disc-shaped elevator to reach the bottom of the building, enabling them to step back into the 21st century, and watch the fish being hoisted aboard a trawler.

The building’s curving steel trusses form the 37,095 sq metre spiral of windows on which the disabled-accessible bar and restaurant Luce in the third level of the building’s first floor face.

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