New teddy bear marketed as a ‘vaccine blocker’ has critics concerned for the well-being of children

There has been concern about the newest addition to the “Omicron” line of teddy bears on Amazon — a little girl’s pink plush doll that has been made to look like a measles- and…

New teddy bear marketed as a ‘vaccine blocker’ has critics concerned for the well-being of children

There has been concern about the newest addition to the “Omicron” line of teddy bears on Amazon — a little girl’s pink plush doll that has been made to look like a measles- and polio-vaccine blocker.

But despite the concern raised by feminist groups and earlier vaccine advocates, there’s little evidence to suggest that the doll will pose a problem to children.

Rizwan Azim Khan, a Stanford University professor and an expert on child health at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, told CNN that the doll might have been “just a silly looking way of marketing the product.”

“But it didn’t really appear to be having a serious impact on anybody’s behavior or educational development,” he added.

The Omicron Toy Co. has defended the doll, telling The Washington Post that it wants to “help educate the public on the realities of modern-day danger of diseases like measles.”

My daughter asked me if the new doll they are selling is a vaccine blocker. I said no, it is a doll. She went nuts. An absolutely brilliant marketing idea. #TeamMeasles, take your children to school! Now it’s time to take a hit to their income tax refunds. #TeamMoms pic.twitter.com/sfy9PFwYMV — Measles Girl (@FetusMags) November 5, 2018

Merck, which makes the vaccine, told CNN that “the vaccine itself is not a vaccine block” and that they “wouldn’t prevent the measles.”

Still, the recent uproar may have encouraged Merck to find a way to make the vaccine seem more effective. In June, the company began a trial in which children received the MMR shot with a specific type of placebo that could cause some to wrongly believe they were getting the real vaccine.

Such products may seem counterintuitive, but as NPR notes, they’re common. Several teddy bears on Amazon are programmed to squeal at the sight of an insect or weird food in a video.

Read the full story at CNN.

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