Researchers dispute impact of drug that is going mainstream

Written by By Caleb James, CNN A company that developed the world’s first drug specifically to treat opioid addiction has found that the impact of its medication was exaggerated in many instances. “Unlike highly…

Researchers dispute impact of drug that is going mainstream

Written by By Caleb James, CNN

A company that developed the world’s first drug specifically to treat opioid addiction has found that the impact of its medication was exaggerated in many instances.

“Unlike highly addictive opioids, our patients receiving Vyvanse have reported positive signs and reduced behaviors that are not congruent with addiction,” said Otis Brawley, chief medical officer for the company, Merck, in a blog post Monday. “Additionally, Vyvanse is less dangerous and less addictive than highly addictive opioids.”

The company submitted data from a final review of an ongoing clinical trial of the drug last year for publication in the European Journal of Psychiatry. The trial featured results from a clinical trial called STAR*D, which led the drug’s approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in July 2010.

A year after that, the drug was approved in Europe and Canada, and in 2016, the Scottish government awarded it the nation’s official treatment for opioid addiction.

The drug costs between $8 per day, per individual, and $21 for a two-week supply, according to Merck.

In his blog post, Brawley described the effects of the drug on individuals who take it.

“The only patients who are consistent who received daily doses of Vyvanse for 2 weeks were able to give up illicit drugs (substance abuse),” he wrote.

The results of the study, which focused on eight participants who began the trial before Vyvanse was approved in the US, were published in the journal in 2016. While the patients in the trial had reported improvements in their measures of well-being, there were some limitations to the trial, according to Brawley.

“Sensory impairment due to the drug was significant, but to a lesser extent than with active opioid treatment,” he wrote. “Patients started and stopped treatment almost weekly, which was noted, but not significant, in the sample.”

In an interview with the BBC, Merck Vice President Kristin Lundgren commented on the trial data, saying, “There’s variability across the randomized controlled trials, and this is true for every treatment.”

She added, “This was the most rigorous trial we could have done for the STAR*D study.”

The company plans to make its data available to the public as part of its analysis of the efficacy of the drug.

“A validated and consistent analysis of all components of the drug along with control agents for comparison of safety can be meaningful for regulators who may want to use these findings in determining whether drug candidates deserve approval,” Brawley wrote.

This is not the first controversy Merck has faced over Vyvanse.

The company faced backlash when it decided to market the drug to children who were just diagnosed with ADHD.

But according to Lundgren, the company has increased access to the drug for children.

Leave a Comment