‘The Breakfast Club’ Remake Uses Ghost-Hunting and Anger Management to Bring Back an Iconic Movie

Just when we think something about Hollywood could never be any bigger, two movies about an iconic cast of ’80s-era teen reboots come out in one month: The Karate Kid remake, Cobra Kai, which…

‘The Breakfast Club’ Remake Uses Ghost-Hunting and Anger Management to Bring Back an Iconic Movie

Just when we think something about Hollywood could never be any bigger, two movies about an iconic cast of ’80s-era teen reboots come out in one month: The Karate Kid remake, Cobra Kai, which features The Breakfast Club’s Jaden Smith in its cast, and the critically-acclaimed The Breakfast Club.

Jaden Smith and Hayden Panettiere in “Cobra Kai.”

Both films combine and mash up nostalgia with plot points from around the ’80s-’90s slasher and slasher-comedy sub-genre of blockbuster action fare. Whereas the first film was about five nice children from a decent middle-class family, the second tells the story of a kid from another group who has moved into the neighborhood and apparently been around enough people to bond with them all.

Of course, anyone who hasn’t seen the first film knows the kicker at the end. The angry uncles, at long last accepting that their sons got beaten up by a fellow teenager, decide to make up with the kid and bring him in to participate in their karate dojo.

Original leads Roddy McDowall and William Zabka (as Johnny Lawrence) had both died by the time production started on the second film. Still, for a remake that has everything going for it in its favor — it’s got four actors from classic movies in its cast, a bunch of fresh blood involved with reviving the franchise, and apparently unfinished business that requires resolution — casting Danny Lloyd was a bit of a dubious move.

Director Harald Zwart (the helmer of another quality ’80s monster movie remake, 2013’s Mortal Instruments: City of Bones) has the tough job of finding just the right actor to play the 6-year-old who kicked Lawrence’s butt, and in making it all work, he’s opted for a slightly eerie/cheesy vibe that seems to work for its teen audience. (The villains in the film seem to be an entirely different species.)

Meanwhile, as for the rest of the actors in The Breakfast Club, stars Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, and Anthony Michael Hall all reprised their roles. It’s not much, but at least they seem to be having a ball in the scenes they’re in.

It’s a nice scene where the actors came together for pre-screening talk, written by Anna Graham Hunter. She is the writer of both The Karate Kid remake and The Breakfast Club, both co-written by Anthony Zuiker.

On screen, Hayden Panettiere, as Elena, suffers from major PTSD from the death of her brother, and was apparently so gung-ho on not dying that she refused to get any blood drawn for the medical procedure required in order to purge the aggression built up from years of trauma.

Most of the movies’ main players are participating in these surprise appearances. On screen at the same time is none other than Christopher Lloyd (that must feel good).

Leave a Comment