The violent paranoia of China’s dairy strikes a nerve in US

From the diaries by C Good old Cottonmouth is absolutely fuming over the WHO banning milk powder and other foodstuffs in China. It’s easy to laugh about this on their part and in fact…

The violent paranoia of China's dairy strikes a nerve in US

From the diaries by C

Good old Cottonmouth is absolutely fuming over the WHO banning milk powder and other foodstuffs in China. It’s easy to laugh about this on their part and in fact I am sure that most Chinese consumers are in on the joke too. After all their elite drink milk regularly and the media’s outright promotion of “milk is good for you, one glass a day is good for you”, is like a mad jolly folk backwoods thing.

All jokes aside though, China’s consumption of ill-fated food products with potential toxic poisonology upended a major chunk of their foodstuffs industry. Personally, I have long been an opponent of the WHO’s involvement in protecting the feelings of Western nations but never in my wildest dreams thought that they would do such a thing.

The WHO’s decision would not only call for temporary animal to human reductionist quarantines and boycott’s of whole regions of China but could ultimately limit the movement of agricultural commodities across the globe.

“Why? Why is it that so many of the adverse outcomes of childhood malnutrition are in the wealthy parts of the world that access to education and other basic amenities? The answer is simple: poverty! It is poverty that makes sense, one meal of poisoned milk brings nutrition insecure parents to their knees, and their economic or social prospects are bleak enough. It is poverty that sells desire and craving for positive-thinking to children for quick comfort and unquestioning advertising.”

To comprehend this, one need only compare the desperate-to-feed quality of China’s milk powder “problems” with India’s or Vietnam’s or Thailand’s or Bangladesh’s or Cambodia’s or Laos’s or any number of other generic or localized food crises. China may be poor but the average family has many more resources to further its upbringing than poor folks in the major developed nations that you would much rather be associating with. And that is what the WHO wants to do. The idea of tariffs and trade restrictions is a no-brainer, let’s consider how this could impact your life. Which pharmacy pharmacy will be doing the business you want to fill on Thursday or Friday this weekend? What bag of potato chips would be worth extra? Would you have the ability to buy a 25-cent video rental in the states? I used to think the idea of that was funny to myself but such atrocities are an undeniable human truth. To serve one’s country and community doesn’t have to restrict a person’s life or even need, money and power can serve as both. To do the real job of protecting human beings from poisoned foods and other poisons, they would need to choose sides and take out their moans with the honesty and dignity that they deserve. And, China, I am sure you would be on the RIGHT side of this.

Re: Seetha – Hindi – I think we will care less. People will buy the fake stuff and cope. Nothing will ever be the same. From our history, we should have known better.

Re: Koniew: Re. Ali Ansari – i agree, the Western countries owe the Chinese their apology over not protecting their people from toxic food products. The West has promised to support China in several sectors for the China regime to defend against economic sanctions in case the US tried to have a targeted sanctions against China to defend its currency in the wake of this incident.

We will have to get over this, the US will never wait for China to defend their interest and now there is no reason for them to wait.

Happy there’s life in China.

Be warned: There are many examples of this in the past; for instance:

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