Toronto university apologizes for giving ‘stolen’ car to student who was gone for months

Kevin Donovan was on vacation with his partner in Jamaica when an email from Toronto told him his car had been stolen from his front porch. Toronto police had been sending him alerts about…

Toronto university apologizes for giving ‘stolen’ car to student who was gone for months

Kevin Donovan was on vacation with his partner in Jamaica when an email from Toronto told him his car had been stolen from his front porch.

Toronto police had been sending him alerts about stolen vehicles. Donovan’s VW Passat keys weren’t in the glove box. But he thought his car was secure. He could park on a paved lot. He didn’t have the keys in his pocket, and he didn’t have the keys in his purse.

Instead, his auto was remote-wiped.

“I just assumed the car was insured, so I was pretty shocked,” Donovan told CBC News.

No one had called to tell him his car was missing. Donovan said police may have gotten in touch with him when they discovered the serial number that had been left on the steering wheel.

“We had contacted someone around the same time my car was stolen and they said they put the safety key in the car,” Donovan told The Washington Post in an email.

It’s a lesson for anyone who leaves keys in a vehicle: it’s a great way to lose or get robbed.

The Globe and Mail reported on Saturday that the stolen vehicle was traced to a Halifax port, where it was transported to the Middle East. The vehicle was rented to a driver from a subsidiary of Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt, who rented the vehicle in Alexandria, The Globe and Mail reported.

The story led to anger and disgust in the Canadian media, including from Donovan’s son, who said his father didn’t deserve to have his car stolen or stolen by a university without security measures in place to ensure the safety of the vehicle.

Toronto Police on Monday said the university issued an apology, reported CBC News. Al-Azhar University and Gateway Atlantic told CBC News that there were no security checks or checks on the driver who rented the car.

Meantime, more than 900,000 people have signed a petition calling for the SUV, which was recovered in Pennsylvania, to be given back to Donovan.

Donovan told CBC News that the university was negligent.

“I’m just frustrated because I feel let down by the authorities that were supposed to be protecting my stuff,” Donovan said.

Leave a Comment