Total lunar eclipse, also known as the Supermoon, happens early Friday morning

Americans awoke to a partial lunar eclipse on Thursday, which is also known as a blood moon or the supermoon. The moon was fully illuminated during the first part of the eclipse, which happens…

Total lunar eclipse, also known as the Supermoon, happens early Friday morning

Americans awoke to a partial lunar eclipse on Thursday, which is also known as a blood moon or the supermoon.

The moon was fully illuminated during the first part of the eclipse, which happens when the moon is fully illuminated due to the proximity of the Earth to the sun. However, the Earth blocks the light from the sun, causing parts of the moon to appear red. It’s worth noting that on a dark Earth, a lunar eclipse can appear much different than on a bright one.

The total eclipse began at 11:39 a.m. ET and was visible from most of the United States, South America, western Europe, eastern Africa, and eastern Asia. NASA said that the western portion of the country appeared to have to deal with a partial eclipse, while the eastern portion saw a mostly dark moon.

Before sunrise on Friday, people gathered to watch the moon pass through Earth’s shadow. Share this video to show the magnitude of the #Eclipse on Friday morning. pic.twitter.com/o8qXVWKLgp — NASA (@NASA) February 22, 2017

A full blood moon, which is visible from North America and parts of Europe and Africa, is especially rare. The next one occurs in 2033. On Thursday, the moon was discovered to be a little larger than usual. The moon was actually a little bigger when the eclipse began but then got smaller as it transitioned to an eclipse, after which it was in the shadow for about an hour.

In Myanmar, people were so excited that two police officers beat up one of the country’s TV reporters over incorrectly predicting that a lunar eclipse was coming.

Indian space agency ISRO Director Rakesh Sharma also tweeted a message for North American scientists and to remind them that the next supermoon will be in 2033.

Perplexed? Check out our lunar eclipse photos on Twitter! pic.twitter.com/gADTB2GWv7 — ISRO (@isro) February 22, 2017

Photo

Photos

Related

A female astronomer highlights the coming days of supermoon and total lunar eclipse

Leave a Comment